Mike's Baetis Nymph
Mike's Baetis Nymph
Upper River Pattern
Hook: Daiichi 1270 size 22
Thread: Tan 3/0 Uni-Thread
Tail: Dark Dun Microfibetts
Body: Thread
Thorax: Thread
Wingcase: Black Foam Strip (1/16” square)
Legs: Tan Antron
Instructions:

1.      Place the hook in the vise, secure thread and wrap back to bend making sure to leave the thread tag hanging out the back.

2.      Tie in 2 microfibetts along the top of the shank extending back to about 1 body length.

3.      Split the tail by pulling the tag end back up through the two fibetts.  The more you pull back toward the eye, the more the tail will splay.

4.      When you get the right split, tie down the tag end with one or two tight wraps.

5.      Spin the thread tight to form a rope the wrap the thread forward forming a nice segmented body.  Leave plenty of room for the head, legs, and wingcase.

6.        Tie in the tip of the foam with several tight turns and the long end pointing back.  Trim the tag end if necessary.

7.        Build up a thorax with the thread but leave room near the head to tie in the legs.

8.        Take a 3 inch bunch (4-6 strands) of antron and secure near the middle of the bunch so that half points forward and half back. 

9.        Pull both ends back and to the side and wrap over to force the legs back along the site of the thorax.  One or two turns of thread usually do.

10.  Pull the foam over the top of the thorax and secure with 2-3 tight turns. Don’t pull the foam too tight.  You want the wingcase to be pronounced.

11.  Trim the foam, whip finish, trim thread and cement.

12.  Trim the legs to size (about body length).

13.  Lightly color the top of the body with a brown waterproof marker.  Not too much!

Variations & Comments: This pattern is a great baetis pattern that has many different uses.  If you substitute black antron or poly yarn for the wingcase it will sink better (and you can fold back the butts for legs) but you can just add a little weight and this pattern will fish very well near the bottom.  As the hatch progresses, I’ve had great luck trailing this pattern behind a parachute adams or sparkle dun and fishing it in the film as an emerger.  I also tie this one in brown, olive, gray, and black.